Posts Tagged ‘soy sauce’

Momofuku Bo Ssam

June 24, 2012

I am always up for something different, a challenge if you will, on a Sunday. I have more time than any weekday prior, and I am a rejuvenated version of myself from the Saturday off. I have time to search out unique ingredients, slow roast meat, patiently babysit the evening’s dinner, and do something a little extraordinary. We always open a bottle of wine, watch a movie or the HBO series de jour and enjoy a celebration of the wonderful weekend.

I love Korean food so when my husband and I saw this recipe in the New York Times from Momofuku in NYC, I was intrigued. Essentially, Bo Ssam is a slow roasted pig that is then served with many accompaniments and sauces to be wrapped with rice in a lettuce leaf. A version that serves 6-10 people (like the recipe below) goes for $200 at Momofuku. And for good reason with all of the ingredients, time and love that goes into it. It looked like quite a production – the perfect meal for a Sunday night.

The ingredients are easier to find than you would think, with the exception of kimchi which resulted in a trip to our Asian market to purchase. Could you do without one item? One sauce? One accompaniment? Sure. But do you want to go through all of this effort and be one element short? I don’t think so.

The Bo Ssam was worth every effort I put into it. And, it is quite an impressive feast when spread out on a table. The pork is so tender it falls apart, and has such a deep flavor, despite not having excessive seasoning. And every sauce, every element goes perfectly together in the lettuce. With leftovers the next day, I shredded the pork, mixed in some of the sauces, and we made sliders. Also delicious.

So if you have a Sunday when you are feeling up for something special, I highly recommend this recipe. Because of this size, it also is perfect for entertaining. Although much cheaper than a flight to NYC and $200 to eat this at Momfuku, I officially put that experience on my to do list. I am sure it is worth every penny.

BO SSAM (from Momofuku)
Serves 6-8
Pork Butt:
1 whole bone-in pork butt or picnic ham (8 to 10 pounds)
1 cup white sugar
1 cup plus 1 tablespoon kosher salt
7 tablespoons brown sugar

Ginger-Scallion Sauce:
2½ cups thinly sliced scallions, both green and white parts
½ cup peeled, minced fresh ginger
¼ cup neutral oil (like grapeseed)
1½ teaspoons light soy sauce
1 scant teaspoon sherry vinegar
½ teaspoon kosher salt, or to taste

Ssam Sauce:
2 tablespoons fermented bean-and- chili paste (ssamjang, available in many Asian markets, and online)
1 tablespoon chili paste (kochujang, available in many Asian markets, and online)
½ cup sherry vinegar
½ cup neutral oil (like grapeseed)

Accompaniments:
2 cups plain white rice, cooked
3 heads bibb lettuce, leaves separated, washed and dried
1 dozen or more fresh oysters (optional – I did not include))
Kimchi (available in many Asian markets, and online).

1. Place the pork in a large, shallow bowl. Mix the white sugar and 1 cup of the salt together in another bowl, then rub the mixture all over the meat. Cover it with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least 6 hours, or overnight.

2. When you’re ready to cook, heat oven to 300. Remove pork from refrigerator and discard any juices. Place the pork in a roasting pan and set in the oven and cook for approximately 6 hours, or until it collapses, yielding easily to the tines of a fork. (After the first hour, baste hourly with pan juices.) At this point, you may remove the meat from the oven and allow it to rest for up to an hour.

3. Meanwhile, make the ginger-scallion sauce. In a large bowl, combine the scallions with the rest of the ingredients. Mix well and taste, adding salt if needed.

4. Make the ssam sauce. In a medium bowl, combine the chili pastes with the vinegar and oil, and mix well.

5. Prepare rice, wash lettuce and, if using, shuck the oysters. Put kimchi and sauces into serving bowls.

6. When your accompaniments are prepared and you are ready to serve the food, turn oven to 500. In a small bowl, stir together the remaining tablespoon of salt with the brown sugar. Rub this mixture all over the cooked pork. Place in oven for approximately 10 to 15 minutes, or until a dark caramel crust has developed on the meat. Serve hot, with the accompaniments.

Marinated Chicken Thighs with Sweet Potato

June 24, 2010

My husband isn’t too big on chicken thighs – every once in a while he is in the mood, but always feels like they are a bit greasy (which is, of course why I love them!). But, I had never tried grilling them, and wondered if the outcome would be different than an oven or a pan.

The skin gets crispier on the grill (with less grease, since it drips into the grill) and the meat is incredibly moist. My husband loved them.

So while chicken thighs cooked in the house will remain limited, I will certainly be learning more chicken thigh recipes on the grill.

This recipe is from Cooking Light and is considered an “Australian Beach Recipe.” The five-spice (a Chinese spice) gives its unique flavor and the mirin and ginger continue to emphasize the Asian flavors. However, the chicken itself has a unique flavor, unlike most Asian chicken I have made. Don’t miss out on the side dish either – it goes perfectly with the chicken. It is the perfect summer meal.

MARINATED CHICKEN THIGHS WITH SWEET POTATO
6 Servings

3 tablespoons less-sodium soy sauce
1 1/2 tablespoons honey
1 1/2 tablespoons grated peeled fresh ginger
1 tablespoon mirin
1/4 teaspoon five-spice powder
2 garlic cloves, sliced
2 tablespoons canola oil, divided
12 skin-on, bone-in chicken thighs
3 small sweet potatoes (about 7 ounces each)
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Cooking spray
1 medium yellow onion, vertically sliced
1 cup red bell pepper strips
1 cup yellow bell pepper strips
3 tablespoons tomato sauce
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar
3 tablespoons thinly sliced green onions

Combine first 6 ingredients in a large zip-top plastic bag. Add 1 1/2 teaspoons oil and chicken; seal. Marinate in refrigerator 2 hours, turning bag occasionally.

Preheat grill to medium-high heat.

Cut potatoes in half lengthwise; cut each potato piece in half crosswise. Add potato wedges to a large pot of boiling water; reduce heat, and simmer 5 minutes. Drain. Combine potatoes, 1 1/2 teaspoons oil, and 1/4 teaspoon salt.

Remove chicken from marinade; discard marinade. Sprinkle chicken with 1/4 teaspoon salt and black pepper. Arrange on a grill rack coated with cooking spray; grill 8 minutes on each side or until done. Remove from grill; keep warm. (Discard skin before serving.) Arrange potato on grill rack; grill 4 minutes on each side or until done.

Heat remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over high heat. Add yellow onion; stir-fry 1 minute. Add bell peppers; stir-fry 2 minutes. Add tomato sauce and vinegar; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Serve bell pepper mixture with chicken and potatoes. Top with green onions.

Pork Tonkatsu

February 28, 2010

I will admit this dish might have been my first attempt at Japanese food. It isn’t that I don’t love Japanese food because I really do, I just never seem to find many recipes, and when I do they seem a bit intimidating.

But this Japanese classic looked easy enough. Apparently, pork tonkatsu is incredibly common in Japanese cuisine – it consists of any type of pork that is dredged and then coated in Panko. Many people serve it with a Japanese Worcestershire sauce that includes pureed apples, mustard and soy. This recipe calls for making your own sauce, which gives the dish a rich and tangy flavor. It tastes like a Japanese BBQ sauce and would probably be fantastic used in other ways (glazing chicken, etc.).

This recipe comes from Food & Wine. I recommend serving it with rice and steamed spinach (with a little soy).

PORK TONKATSU
Serves 4

1/4 cup ketchup
1/4 cup apple butter or applesauce
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon unseasoned rice vinegar
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 egg whites, beaten
1 cup panko (Japanese bread crumbs)
Two 8-ounce pork tenderloins, cut into 2-inch pieces and pounded 1/2 inch thick
Salt
1/4 cup canola oil
Steamed rice and steamed spinach, for serving

In a saucepan, bring the ketchup, apple butter, Worcestershire, soy, mustard and vinegar to a simmer; transfer to 4 bowls. Cool.

Put the flour, egg whites and panko in 3 separate shallow bowls. Season the pork cutlets with salt, then dredge in the flour, tapping off the excess. Dip the cutlets in the egg white, followed by the panko, pressing the crumbs to help them adhere.

In a large skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of the oil. Add the cutlets and cook over moderate heat until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Brush the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil on the cutlets. Flip and cook until golden and cooked through, about 5 minutes longer. Transfer the tonkatsu to a work surface and cut into strips. Transfer to plates and serve with rice, spinach and the dipping sauce (either serve dipping sauce in small bowls, or pour over the pork like I did).

Pork Tenderloin Stir-Fry with Tangerines and Chili Sauce

November 29, 2009

As you may know, I generally don’t make Asian food since it tends to be common restaurant food for my husband and I. But lately, I have realized that you can make some pretty great Asian food at home – not the same ambiance as our favorite little Thai restaurant, but great for a unique weeknight meal.

This recipe is from my favorite, Bon Appetit. There is something about the citrus and spicy chili sauce that gives it the perfect spicy-sweet combination. Make sure to get the red sweet chili sauce (often in your International food aisle) not the chili-garlic sauce that is a brown color. I almost made the mistake of thinking “it is about the same thing, right?” since I had chili-garlic on hand. But, when I ended up buying the sweet chili sauce and tasted it – wow, totally different sauce! Not saying it wouldn’t be potentially good with the chili-garlic, but it is out of this world with the sweet garlic!

PORK TENDERLOIN STIR-FRY WITH TANGERINES AND CHILI SAUCE
4 Servings

1 1 1/4-pound pork tenderloin, trimmed, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick rounds, then cut into 1/2-inch-wide strips
1 tablespoon cornstarch
2 tablespoons Asian sesame oil, divided
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger
4 small unpeeled tangerines or clementines, cut (with peel) into 3/4-inch pieces
1/4 cup Asian sweet chili sauce
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1/4 teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder
6 baby bok choy, cut crosswise into 1-inch-thick ribbons, tough bases discarded
5 green onions, thinly sliced on diagonal, divided

Place pork tenderloin strips in medium bowl; sprinkle with salt and freshly ground black pepper and toss with cornstarch to coat. Heat 1 tablespoon sesame oil in large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add minced ginger; stir 30 seconds. Add pork tenderloin strips; stir-fry until pork is beginning to brown and is almost cooked through, about 3 minutes. Add tangerine pieces; toss 30 seconds. Add sweet chili sauce, soy sauce, and Chinese five-spice powder; boil until sauce in skillet thickens slightly, tossing to blend, about 1 minute. Stir in remaining 1 tablespoon sesame oil, bok choy, and half of sliced green onions. Stir-fry just until bok choy is wilted, 1 to 2 minutes. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Transfer to bowl; sprinkle with remaining sliced green onions and serve.

Sate Chicken Salad

April 25, 2009

img_02962If you love Thai food, but don’t always want the heavy rice or fried noodles, this recipe won’t disappoint. I made it hot for dinner but it would work well cold as a summer dish, too. Omit the chicken and it would make a great side as well.

Instead of the rotisserie the recipe calls for, I just cooked some chicken in sesame oil and red pepper flakes in a non-stick skillet. Also, I was out of soy sauce, so I substituted fish sauce (since the ingredients are slightly similar). It was amazing and I didn’t taste the omission, but I will certainly add the soy next time around. It was a great, light, crunchy dish with tons of flavor. Thanks to Gourmet magazine for this one!

SATE CHICKEN SALAD
Serves 6-8
1/4 cup dry-roasted peanuts
1 large garlic clove
1 (1-inch) piece peeled ginger
2/3 cup smooth peanut butter (not natural-style)
6 tablespoons warm water
3 tablespoons rice vinegar
2.5 tablespoons soy sauce
1.5 tablespoons Asian sesame oil
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon hot red-pepper flakes
3 cups slices or coarsely shredding rotisserie chicken
1 lb coleslaw mix
3 celery ribs, thinly sliced
1 red bell pepper, sliced
1 bunch scallions, chopped
1 cup coarsely chopped cilantro
Lime wedges for garnish

Pulse peanuts in a food processor until coarsely chopped, then transfer to a bowl. With motor running, drop garlic and ginger through feed tube and finely chop. Add peanut butter, water, vinegar, soy sauce, sesame oil, sugar and red-pepper flakes and blend until smooth. Add more water to obtain desired consistency.

Toss chicken and vegetables with enough dressing to coat, then sprinkle with peanuts and cilantro.


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